It’s helped us - now we need to help Legacy

Fun at the fundraising disco for Legacy Rainbow House, held at the Fielden Centre, Todmorden
Fun at the fundraising disco for Legacy Rainbow House, held at the Fielden Centre, Todmorden

A YOUNG disabled DJ who has overcome all the odds is among Todmorden people raising money to help fund a specialist support unit.

Jonathan Knowles, 25, was diagnosed with cerebral palsy spastic quadriplegia along with severe visual impairments when he was eight months old and has been attending The Legacy Rainbow House for life changing therapy since 2007.

Several children and young people from Todmorden have benefitted from the Ormskirk-based charity’s work over the last decade. It relies on fundraising to sustain and develop its conducive therapy services.

Recently Joanne Greenwood, whose sons Andrew and Nathan attend Rainbow, held a fundraising disco at the Fielden Centre which raised around £100 at which Jonathan manned the music controls. Joanne said everyone had a good time.

Jonathan is the Legacy’s oldest visitor and volunteers his free time and DJ skills at their events where possible.

He said: “Conducive therapy has built my confidence and independence greatly and as a result of this, I can even live independently in a sheltered accommodation.

“I really value all the support Rainbow House has given me over the years and I really hope to raise this funding as it will allow me to continue to attend and maintain a level of independence and mobility.”

Jonathan will be arranging fundraising events to reach his own £3,000 target and has a Just Giving page - www.justgiving.com/JonathansAppeal and you can also follow his updates on Twitter - @JKWheelie.