DCSIMG

Lions mark service and help deaf people’s charity

Lions' District Governor John Hall and Mayor of Todmorden Coun Michael Gill present Natasha Salmon with her gold Young Leaders In Service award

Lions' District Governor John Hall and Mayor of Todmorden Coun Michael Gill present Natasha Salmon with her gold Young Leaders In Service award

Awards for young people’s contribution to the community and a gift to support a charity for deaf people were made at Todmorden Lions’ presentation evening.

As reported in last week’s edition of the Todmorden News, a main award of the evening was the presentation of a sports wheelchair to Great Britain table tennis star and Paralympic hopeful Megan Shackleton, for which Lions launched a fundraising appeal to buy the £5,000 piece of kit last summer.

But the evening, which concluded with a pie and peas supper, also saw Young Leaders in Service awards presented to four young people who are part of the junior Leos section of the volunteer organisation.

A silver award for a minimum of 50 hours’ service over the past year was made to Thomas Kaye and received by his mum Melanie as he was unable to attend on the night, and gold awards, for at least 100 hours service were made to Georgina Allen, Laura Salmon and to Leos president Natasha Salmon.

These were all presented by Lions district governor John Hall and Mayor of Todmorden Coun Michael Gill, and they made a further award to Natasha, the 100 per cent President’s Award. Natsha has been Leos president for two years.

Megan received her chair from Todmorden Lions President Pam Lally and she also made the final award of the evening to Dr Paul Whittaker of Music And The Deaf, a cheque to help the charity’s work. It aims to help deaf people, and those who live and work them, access and enjoy music together.

Paul was the evening’s speaker, and his energetic talk informed his audience about his life, career and the charity’s work. Paul demonstrated how deaf people can enjoy music and involved his audience several times, including a clapping exercise and signing a song, concluding by playing a tape of some music which he sang and signed along to.

His talk was packed with humour as well as being informative and was very much enjoyed by everyone present.

Master of ceremonies for the night was Lion Rod Wainwright, who outlined Lions history, in particular the work it had done for blind people, and its worldwide background, an organisation with millions of members across the globe.

What Lions could do was demonstrated by the work of its volunteers and the help the club was able to give to Megan and to Paul’s charity.

 

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