Mum who killed her two daughters dreamt of stitching up their wounds and “they came back”

Samira Lupidi with one-year-old Jasmine Weaver (right) and three-year-old Evelyn Lupidi (left)
Samira Lupidi with one-year-old Jasmine Weaver (right) and three-year-old Evelyn Lupidi (left)

A mum who killed her young daughters in “frenzied multiple stabbing” told a psychiatrist she dreamt she stitched up their wounds and “they came back”, a court heard.

Italian Samira Lupidi is standing trial for the murder of her two girls - Evelyn, three and 17-month-old Jasmine - on November 17, last year.

The 24-year-old is charged with two counts murder of after stabbing them to death at a womens’ refuge, the day after she arrived.

She has admitted manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility.

Bradford Crown Court heard previously that both girls were found with nine stab wounds to the chest and multiple incision wounds.

Today (Wednesday) the court heard that while in prison following the incident, Lupidi was questioned by forensic psychiatrist Dr Jasanne Holloway and told her about the dream she had had.

Peter Moulson QC, prosecuting, said: “She said she could not believe what she had done.

“She said ‘I have this dream where I stitch the wounds and they come back’.

“They were my strength I wanted to run away with them.”

The court heard previously that Lupidi and her daughters had ended up in the refuge after she called police to her home in Heckmondwike.

She had told officers that her partner Carl Weaver, 31, had slapped her twice the night before, the court previously heard.

On Tuesday, the jury heard how Lupidi was paranoid Mr Weavers would leave her and take the children with him.

Dr Holloway told the court previously: “She [Lupidi] felt emotionally lost and scared and confused when her partner was texting her in the safe house.

“She was afraid he would take the girls away, she said if she had not been alone or receiving text messages then the children would still be alive.”

On Tuesday, Dr Holloway concluded that Lupidi did suffer with a moderate to severe depression but that this did not contribute to the killing and did not amount to diminished responsibility.

In cross examination today, Dr Holloway told the court: “I am saying the (depressive disorder) didn’t substantially impair her.”

When questioned by Lupidi’s barrister Angle Rafferty QC, if it had any bearing to what she did to the children on November 17, Dr Holloway replied: “She had it,so it was there, but whether it was the driver, or more significant driver, I don’t know.

“It would have had some effect but I don’t think that it was the significant driver.”

She added: “In terms of her mental illness it is in the background but it is not the thing that was a significant contributing factor to the way she behaved when she was killing the children.”

Miss Rafferty said the defence’s psychiatrist has stated the Dr Holloway hadn’t really given a psychiatric reason to why Lupidi “ended up killing both her children in a “frenzied multiple stabbing”.

Dr Hollway replied that there isn’t “one or two explanations of behaviour, there are loads”.

Lupidi, dressed in a white shirt, gray cardigan, brown trousers and with her long, dark hair up, sat with her head down throughout today’s morning hearing.

She appeared to be crying on and off and was hugging her upper body.

The court heard Lupidi didn’t have a good relationship with her mother while growing up and felt emotionally neglected by her.

She also smoked cannabis and heroin as a teenager.

Speaking about the drugs, Dr Holloway said: “It is not appropriate behaviour but it is behaviour that is not unacceptable in young people.”

She denies two counts of murder. The case continues.