Students get a taste of the Home Front

An Anderson Shelter and 'Dig For Victory' vegetable allotment have been built in the grounds of Todmorden High School to be used by GCSE history students learning about life during World War Two
An Anderson Shelter and 'Dig For Victory' vegetable allotment have been built in the grounds of Todmorden High School to be used by GCSE history students learning about life during World War Two

HISTORY has come to life for students at Todmorden High School.

The school’s site manager, Matthew Harrow, has built a replica of a World War Two Anderson air raid shelter and a “Dig For Victory” vegetable allotment, enabling the students to actively learn about the Home Front during their history lessons.

The aim is to help pupils studying GCSE history as part of the course is a study of life in Britain during World War Two, focusing on the impact of air raids and rationing on everyday life.

Anderson Shelters were erected in back gardens so that families could shelter during air raids in the blitz.

“Dig For Victory” was a government campaign to encourage families to grow more vegetables and make up for food shortages during rationing.

Year nine students are using a World War Two leaflet and working with teacher Paul Murray, the school’s head of agriculture, to design and plant an allotment similar to the kind that local families would have grown during the war to supplement their rations.

The school is seeking the community’s help with the project. It is appealing for anyone who was alive in World War Two and has any photographs or memories of rationing, “Dig For Victory” and Anderson Shelters to send them into the school.