League Cup contestant Dyche bagged star prizes as a player

Sean Dyche must've felt like a gameshow contestant back in his playing days having scooped a number of 'star prizes' in the League Cup.


Sean Dyche must've felt like a gameshow contestant back in his playing days having scooped a number of 'star prizes' in the League Cup.

Clarets boss Sean Dyche

Clarets boss Sean Dyche

The Burnley boss didn't have to answer any questions, solve any puzzles or recall various items on a conveyor belt to claim his reward, though. Dyche's treasures were presented for man of the match displays.

During his time with Chesterfield, playing in the Rumbelows Cup and the Coca-Cola Cup in the '90s, the defender bagged himself a Sony Trinitron one year and a mountain bike another.

Dyche recalled how he handed the television set to his parents while Clarets scout Nicky Law purchased the bike for his son.

Asked about his favourite memories of the competition, Dyche said: "Winning a TV. When it was the Rumbelows Cup you used to win a TV for getting man of the match. I gave it to my mum and dad.

"It was a good quality Sony TV. It was Chesterfield, I played really well, and the next year I won a bike. It was when Coca-Cola sponsored it and because they weren't going to give you a crate of Coca-Cola you used to get a bike.

"I believe Nicky Law, one of our scouts, had it for £25 back in the day. A red Coca-Cola mountain bike. Nicky Law's kid had it. I'm not sure how much he paid me. It was a £150 bike.

"When you're a player at Chesterfield you're not thinking that we're going to win the league, this is pre FA Cup, so you enjoyed the games and a nice little Brucey bonus if you got man of the match was a TV. Which I did.

"A manager of the match would be brilliant because you'd have a great chance of winning it with there only being two of you!

"I remember on the cusp of the turnover when plasmas first started coming out I actually offered that TV to Oxfam and they said 'no, no, everyone wants flat screens now'.

"They wouldn't even take a free TV to give to someone. My mum and dad had had it in a bedroom and it had hardly been used. I thought what has the world come to!

"That was in an era when plasmas were only just coming out as well. And i chucked in a boxed up, brand new portable TV and they said 'no'. They wanted flatscreens."