Flood schemes to progress in Mytholmroyd, Hebden Bridge and Todmorden in 2018

Gorpley: Local MPs and politicians helping plant trees, a project which will continue in 2018
Gorpley: Local MPs and politicians helping plant trees, a project which will continue in 2018

Further flood alleviation works which are scheduled in 2018 should improve the Calder Valley’s defences.

Calderdale Council, with partners including the Environment Agency, will continue on the Calderdale Flood Action Plan during 2018, with 32 actions to be completed by the end of the year.

Mytholmroyd: More schemes are set to be delivered

Mytholmroyd: More schemes are set to be delivered

Consultation and revision of the plan will continue on a quarterly basis.

The plan is also set to be digitally mapped to enable actions to be viewed by location.

Other works to be carried out in 2018 include delivery of a major flood alleviation scheme in Mytholmroyd with works at Cragg Brook, Caldene Bridge and Whitehouses, and further work on the outline business case for the Hebden Bridge Flood Alleviation Scheme, with construction expected to run from the end of 2018 to 2021. This will consist of flood walls and surface water interventions.

Modelling, business case preparation, design and construction will start on the first six schemes in the second phase of flood risk reduction schemes (FRRS 2) throughout Calderdale, for completion within three years.

Development will continue on nine further sites.

Further development work will be done on the community flooding website, Eye on Calderdale (www.eyeoncalderdale.com), to provide continued support to residents and businesses at risk of flooding.

The natural flood management project above Gorpley reservoir at Todmorden will also be continued, including tree planting and environmental improvements such as leaky dams and wetlands.

To the end of 2017, building resilience work completed includes £46 million allocated for flood resilience schemes, including £1 million allocated to natural flood management projects. The money will be used to alter, restore and use landscape features to reduce flood risk.